What is Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT)?

Are you planning of applying to college, then it is vital for you to know what SAT is and how it can affect your application process.

SAT a.k.a. the Scholastic Assessment Test is used in the application process to colleges and universities in the United States. The test measures critical thinking skills and the ability to analyze and solve problems and is often thought of as a measure of future college success. The SAT test is administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) at various locations across the country, and it is developed, published, and scored by the College Board.

The SAT test is administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) at various locations across the country, and it is developed, published, and scored by the College Board. 


Sections of SAT

The SAT test consists of four sections; indispensable reading, mathematics, writing, and an adaptable or equating section. The essay portion of the writing section is always first approximately the test and the combination other parts of the writing section is always last in the region of the test. The clarify sections can modify in their test placement. The reading section of the SAT test consists of 65-minute sections and one 20 minute section. 
All of the test items in this section are compound option questions that pertain to either vitriolic reading or long reading passages. These questions exam reading comprehension, sentence realization, sentence level reading, and paragraph length vital reading. Taking numerous SAT practice tests is recommended for exam day insight.

Why You Must Consider SAT
The SAT is a standardized test meant to show schools how prepared a student is for college by measuring key skills like reading comprehension, computational ability, and clarity of expression. Because so many students take the test, it also provides schools with data about how you compare to your peers nationwide
You’ll almost certainly need to take the SAT or ACT if you’re applying to any colleges or universities in the United States, since most require you to submit test scores with your application. Depending on where you want to apply, your ACT or SAT score can account for as much as 50% of the admission decision, so a strong standardized test score is vital.

How SAT Is Scored

When you take the SAT, you’ll be given a total score between 600 and 2400, which is the sum of reading, math, and writing scores between 200 and 800. But where do those numbers come from?
You start with a raw score for each topic area: the number of questions you got right minus ¼ times the number you answered incorrectly. That number is then converted into a scaled score through a process called equating—the College Board is a bit cagey about how exactly this works, but it’s based on years worth of data rather than how people do on a specific test date.
The average SAT score hovers around 1500 with some variation from year to year, but what counts as a good score for you will really depend on where you’re looking to apply. To get into a top-tier school you’ll probably need a score above 2000, but for the local branch of the state university you might be just fine with a 1400.
Note that the redesigned SAT includes some big changes to the scoring: it’s returning to original 400-1600 scale (you’ll receive a Math score and a Reading/Writing score) and getting rid of the wrong answer penalty.
How To Register For SAT
The SAT test is given seven times a year in the United States. Specific test dates and test locations can be found online on the College Board’s website. 

There are two ways to register for the SAT test, online or by mail. Online registration is completed on the website of the College Board. In order to register by mail, one needs a copy of the SAT Registration Booklet. 

This booklet can be obtained from a high school counselor, and it contains the registration form and envelope, as well as registration instructions. All fees must be paid when registering, whether online or by mail, and fee information can be found online or in the SAT Registration Booklet.
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